Bar Meyuhas

IoT Security

Reichman University

Advisor: Prof. Anat Bremler-Barr

Bio

I am a Ph.D. student at Reichman University and I am working on exciting new ways to provide a secure environment for IoT devices. I hold an M.Sc in Computer Science from the Bar-Ilan University, Israel.

My research is focused on network architecture, network security, and IoT security.

Publications

Projects, thesis, and dissertations
Anat Bremler-Barr, Bar Meyuhas, Tal Shapira
arxiv,
2024

The IoT market is diverse and characterized by a multitude of vendors that support different device functions (e.g., speaker, camera, vacuum cleaner, etc.). Within this market, IoT security
and observability systems use real-time identification techniques to manage these devices effectively. Most existing IoT identification solutions employ machine learning techniques
that assume the IoT device, labeled by both its vendor and function, was observed during their training phase. We tackle a key challenge in IoT labeling: how can an AI solution
label an IoT device that has never been seen before and whose label is unknown?

Our solution extracts textual features such as domain names and hostnames from network traffic, and then enriches these features using Google search data alongside catalog of vendors
and device functions. The solution also integrates an auto-update mechanism that uses Large Language Models (LLMs) to update these catalogs with emerging device types.
Based on the information gathered, the device’s vendor is identified through string matching with the enriched features.
The function is then deduced by LLMs and zero-shot classification from a predefined catalog of IoT functions. In an evaluation of our solution on 97 unique IoT devices,
our function labeling approach achieved HIT1 and HIT2 scores of 0.7 and 0.77, respectively. As far as we know, this is the first research to tackle AI-automated IoT labeling.

Conferences & Workshops
Anat Bremler-Barr, David Hay, Bar Meyuhas, Shoham Danino
ACM/IRTF Applied Networking Research Workshop (ANRW),
2023

We explore the impact of device location on the communication endpoints of IoT devices within the context of Manufacturer Usage Description (MUD), an IETF security framework for IoT devices.
Two types of device location are considered: IP-based location, which corresponds to the physical location of the device based on its IP address; and user-defined location, which is chosen during device registration.
Our findings show that IP-based location barely affects the domain set with which IoT devices interact. Conversely, user-defined location drastically changes this set, mainly through region-specific domains that embody location identifiers selected by the user at registration.
We examine these findings’ effects on creating MUD file tools and IoT device identification. As MUD files rely on allowlists of domain allowlists, we show that security appliances supporting MUD need to manage a significantly larger number of MUD rules than initially anticipated. 
To address this challenge, we leverage EDNS Client Subnet (ECS) extension to differentiate user-defined locations without needing regional domains, consequently reducing the number of Access Control Entries (ACEs) required by security appliances.

Conferences & Workshops
Anat Bremler-Barr, Bar Meyuhas, Ran Shister
IEEE/IFIP NOMS,
2022

Analyzing the network behavior of IoT devices, including which domains, protocols, and ports the device communicates with, is a fundamental challenge for IoT security and identification. Solutions that analyze and manage these areas must be able to learn what constitutes normal device behavior and then extract rules and features to permit only legitimate behavior or identify the device. The Manufacturer Usage Description (MUD) is an IETF white-list protection scheme that formalizes the authorized network behavior in a MUD file; this MUD file can then be used as a type of firewall mechanism.

We demonstrate that learning what is normal behavior for an IoT device is more challenging than expected. In many cases, the same IoT device, with the same firmware, can exhibit different behavior or connect to different domains with different protocols, depending on the device’s geographical location.

Then, we present a technique to generalize MUD files. By processing MUD files that originate in different locations, we can generalize and create a comprehensive MUD file that is applicable for all locations.
To conduct the research, we created MUDIS, a MUD Inspection System tool, that compares and generalizes MUD files. Our open-source MUDIS tool and dataset are available online to researchers and IoT manufacturers, allowing anyone to visualize, compare, and generalize MUD files.

Poster and brief announcement
Anat Bremler-Barr, Bar Meyuhas, Ran Shister
IEEE/IFIP NOMS,
2022

The Manufacturer Usage Description (MUD) is an IETF white-list protection scheme that formalizes the authorized network behavior in a MUD file; this MUD file can then be used as a type of firewall mechanism.

This demo introduces MUDIS, a MUD Inspection System that inspects the network behavior of devices, based on their formal description in the MUD file. We present several use-cases in which MUDIS is useful, including examining the impact of device location, the impact of a firmware update, the correlation of network behavior between different devices of the same manufacture, and more.

MUDIS inspects two MUD files, clusters together and graph- ically visualizes identical, similar, and dissimilar rules. It then calculates a similarity score that measures the similarity between them both. It also generalizes the two MUD files where possible, such that the resulting generalized MUD covers all the permitted (white-list) network behavior for both MUDs.

Our open-source MUDIS tool and proof-of-concept dataset are available for researchers and IoT manufacturers, allowing anyone to gain meaningful insights over the network behavior of IoT devices.

Poster and brief announcement
Anat Bremler-Barr, Bar Meyuhas, Ran Shister
IMC,
2021

Analyzing the network behavior of IoT devices, including which domains, protocols, and ports the device communicates with, is a fundamental challenge for IoT security and identification. Solutions that analyze and manage these areas must be able to learn what constitutes normal device behavior and then extract rules and features to permit only legitimate behavior or to identify the device. The Manufacturer Usage Description (MUD) is an IETF white-list protection scheme that formalizes the authorized network behavior in a MUD file; this MUD file can then be used as a type of firewall mechanism.
We demonstrate that learning what is normal behavior for an IoT device is more challenging than expected. In many cases, the same IoT device, with the same firmware, can exhibit different behavior or connect to different domains with different protocols. This behavior can even change, depending on the device’s geographical location. Thus, MUD functioning and IoT identification methods may not be effective in different locations. The reasons for this vary from country requirements to weak encryption, privacy regulations, CDN-like solutions, and more.